Education Day

Education Day 2018

Speakers

Erin Malone - What I learned on my semester leave (ebooks, as notes, unique perspective on student wellness, opportunities in assessment)   watch | slides

Kenneth Royal - A beginners guide to educational research  watch | slides

Christina Petersen - How to write good test questions that match your learning objectives   slides

 

Posters

Competency-based Veterinary Education: CBVE

Competency-based Veterinary Education: CBVE

Competency-based Veterinary Education: CBVE

Laura K. Molgaard, DVM, Associate Dean for Academic & Student Affairs, University of Minnesota  College of Veterinary Medicine

The Association of American Veterinary Medical Colleges (AAVMC) CBVE Working Group was created and charged with developing a modern competency framework for veterinary education and clinical assessment in July 2015. The group began by systematically analyzing the most contemporary work in competency-based education undertaken in health professions like human medicine. The result of their labor represents one of the most substantial pedagogical projects ever undertaken by the AAVMC. We invite our colleges and schools to embrace this framework as a tool to use in any way they see fit, whether they are in the process of refining or completely redesigning their professional curricula. Competency-based veterinary education (CBVE) is an approach modeled after competency-based medical education (CBME) that prepares graduates for professional careers by confirming their ability to meet animal and societal needs through outcome-focused, learner-centered education and assessment. This poster will describe the framework to encourage faculty to begin to map their content and assessments.

Curriculum mapping at the University of Minnesota College of Veterinary Medicine

Curriculum mapping at the University of Minnesota College of Veterinary Medicine

Curriculum mapping at the University of Minnesota College of Veterinary Medicine

Margaret V. Root Kustritz, DVM, MEd, PhD, DACT

A curriculum map is “a spatial representation of the different components of the curriculum so that the whole picture and the relationships and connections between their parts are easily seen (Harden, Med Teacher 2001;23:123).” Steps for setting up a curriculum map include assessing what information should be entered into the map, determining which tool to use, establishing links between components of the map, deciding on access and training users, and planning for regular updates. The CVM purchased the E*Value system (http://www.medhub.com/evalue/) in 2017. The curriculum was mapped at the course level to topics, keywords, competencies by year and for the program as a whole, and to the AVMA Council on Education competencies. Examples of uses of the curriculum map to date include assessing for gaps and redundancies, helping faculty determine where relevant content is presented before and after their curricular offering, and preparing for an upcoming broad curriculum review prior to our next accreditation site visit.

Efficacy of various teaching paradigms for learning of veterinary embryology: Preliminary results

Efficacy of various teaching paradigms for learning of veterinary embryology: Preliminary results

Efficacy of various teaching paradigms for learning of veterinary embryology: Preliminary results

Margaret V. Root Kustritz, DVM, MEd, PhD, DACT Professor, Assistant Dean of Education, University of Minnesota

Students in the class of 2019 were provided with extensive on-line materials for self-paced veterinary developmental anatomy training (http://vanat.cvm.umn.edu/WebSitesEmbryo.html). Assessment was by closed book examination and points were about 3% of the course grade. Students reported concerns that the topic was too concept-based and visual for them to master on their own and that the low number of points assigned to the topic decreased their incentive to work on the material. Students in the class of 2020 still had all of the on-line resources available in 2019 but also had a 2-hour introductory lecture, an active learning session using a card game to help them apply knowledge about normal embryologic development, and group and individual assignments about common developmental anomalies. Assessment was by open-book on-line examination. The course was pass/fail and students were required to pass this section of the course to be able to pass the anatomy course. Students reported fewer concerns about the teaching paradigm used. Volunteer students from the two cohorts took a closed-book 20-question multiple-choice quiz one year after completing developmental anatomy training and completed a survey. Quiz scores between the two cohorts did not differ. Students in the class of 2020 were more comfortable with their knowledge of normal anatomy than those in the class of 2019. Students in both cohorts were more comfortable with their knowledge of anomalies compared to normal development. Students in both cohorts agreed that there should be more developmental anatomy in the curriculum.

Evaluation of frequency of mid-rotation formative assessment

Evaluation of frequency of mid-rotation formative assessment

Evaluation of frequency of mid-rotation formative assessment 

Margaret V. Root Kustritz, DVM, MEd, PhD, DACT Professor, Assistant Dean of Education, University of Minnesota

Students from the classes of 2017 and 2018 participated in a study regarding mid-rotation assessment frequency and quality. Students from the class of 2017 were surveyed in the month prior to graduation. Students from the class of 2018 were reminded by email every Wednesday to ask for formative evaluation while on clinics and were surveyed in the month prior to their graduation. The survey included questions about how frequently students received formal or information feedback, individually or in groups, in a written or verbal format; from whom they received feedback; where they received feedback (VMC, external CVM sites, externship sites); and the student experience of receiving feedback. The most common type of feedback students received was informal feedback while seeing a case. There was no type of feedback that students reported receiving on more than 10-25% of their rotations. Students received feedback from all relevant personnel in the College. When asked about adequate frequency of feedback provided within or outside of the College, students in both years disagreed that feedback received was adequate in frequency. When asked about quality of feedback, students in both years agreed that personnel were able to communicate their thought in a professional and constructive manner, and that receiving feedback helped them improve and was a positive experience. Work on increasing frequency of formal and informal mid-rotation assessment is ongoing. Faculty, house officers, and staff are strongly encouraged to provide feedback whenever appropriate.

Use of a model board examination and case study assessment for outcomes assessment of curricular change

Use of a model board examination and case study assessment for outcomes assessment of curricular change

Use of a model board examination and case study assessment for outcomes assessment of curricular change

Margaret V. Root Kustritz, DVM, MEd, PhD, DACT Professor, Assistant Dean of Education, University of Minnesota

Students at the University of Minnesota College of Veterinary Medicine participated in a study comparing student ability to integrate basic science and clinical information prior to and after implementing a curriculum revision that introduced a problems-oriented case approach as required coursework. Elective and mandatory case-based problems courses were introduced into the current curriculum. Student knowledge and competence were assessed at the end of the third year of the curriculum, just prior to entry into clinical training, by completion of 100 multiple-choice questions mirroring the breadth and type of questions on the North American Veterinary Licensing Examination and by completion of 10 cases to discern clinical decision-making. Scores from students from the classes of 2015 and 2016 (previous curriculum) were compared to those from students from the classes of 2017 and 2018 (current curriculum). Scores on the multiple-choice assessment were not significantly different between any classes in the previous and current curriculum. Scores for clinical decision-making were significantly higher for students in the current curriculum compared to scores from the final class in the previous curriculum. Students benefit from measured and repetitive practice in clinical reasoning.

ProgRESSVet (Programa Regional de Educación Sistemática de Servicios Veterinarios): Year 1 Evaluation Plan & Initial Results

ProgRESSVet (Programa Regional de Educación Sistemática de Servicios Veterinarios): Year 1 Evaluation Plan & Initial Results

ProgRESSVet (Programa Regional de Educación Sistemática de Servicios Veterinarios): Year 1 Evaluation Plan & Initial Results

Mary Katherine O'Brien, Ph.D. (Researcher for Education & Outreach, Office of the Endowed Chair for Global Animal Health & Food Safety)

Anna Pendleton, Programs & Communications Coordinator, Center for Animal Health & Food Safety

In 2017, the Center for Animal Health & Food Safety at the University of Minnesota and el Centro Buenos Aires para la Capacitación de los Servicios Veterinarios (CEBASEV) in Argentina launched a joint capacity-building educational program for the national Veterinary Services in Latin America.  The eight-month training program is delivered in Spanish, predominantly on-line, employing the best known and innovative practices for distance, technology-supported education. Individual courses based on OIE Advanced Competencies include learning activities and assessments aligned with content-specific learning goals, with focus on the application, integration, and sharing of new knowledge and skills. The poster describes the program's educational model and the Year 1 mixed-methods plan for evaluation and assessment, and includes some initial results from the inaugural 2017 cohort of participants. 

Gastrointestinal Obstruction and Displacement Pathology Lab: An "Exhibition" of Art and Cooperative Learning

Gastrointestinal Obstruction and Displacement Pathology Lab: An "Exhibition" of Art and Cooperative Learning

Gastrointestinal Obstruction and Displacement Pathology Lab: An "Exhibition" of Art and Cooperative Learning

Rob Porter, University of Minnesota, Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory and Veterinary
Population Medicine

Students are introduced to pathology of gastrointestinal disease in CVM 6919 Systemic Pathology.  Physical displacements of the intestine and stomach constitute a relatively common occurrence in both small and large animals. These conditions are often associated with overt changes in the displaced, compromised organs resulting from twisting, obstruction, pressure, infarction or laceration.  Examples of fresh tissue with these lesions are not readily available to teach the veterinary student.  Photos of gross lesions are useful, but these deprive the student of the 3-D aspect of the condition. This 3-D aspect is often vital, particularly to a visual learner, to recognize the condition and understand the pathogenesis. As an alternative to photos the students were placed in groups and assigned a topic to create clay models of these GI conditions using standard air-dry modeling clay, acrylic paints, an array of pathology references and their imagination.  Each group then created a presentation, usually a series of powerpoint slides, to accompany the model.  A rubric was provided to guide the presentation, and make certain that the emphasis was on pathology with a touch of clinical background.  In a subequent session, students present the models at stations in round robin fashion (5 minutes per station).  Presentations include several questions for the captive audience to assess their comprehension. Presentations are given in both ALC 104 and VM 135 to accommodate all groups in two hours. The course instructor does not lecture on this material.  Students are assigned a small number of course points for group participation and also vote for the three most effective presentations to provide peer recognition.  Student response is favorable and comparison of scores for nearly identical questions from 2009-2011 (lecture) GI exams with scores for 2012-1016 (clay lab) show no differences in scores.

 

Students are introduced to pathology of gastrointestinal disease in CVM 6919 SystemicPathology. Physical displacements of the intestine and stomach constitute a relatively commonoccurrence in both small and large animals. These conditions are often associated with overtchanges in the displaced, compromised organs resulting from twisting, obstruction, pressure,infarction or laceration. Examples of fresh tissue with these lesions are not readily available toteach the veterinary student. Photos of gross lesions are useful, but these deprive the student ofthe 3-D aspect of the condition. This 3-D aspect is often vital, particularly to a visual learner, torecognize the condition and understand the pathogenesis. As an alternative to photos the studentswere placed in groups and assigned a topic to create clay models of these GI conditions using
standard air-dry modeling clay, acrylic paints, an array of pathology references and theirimagination. Each group then created a presentation, usually a series of powerpoint slides, toaccompany the model. A rubric was provided to guide the presentation, and make certain thatthe emphasis was on pathology with a touch of clinical background. In a subequent session,students present the models at stations in round robin fashion (5 minutes per station).Presentations include several questions for the captive audience to assess their comprehension.Presentations are given in both ALC 104 and VM 135 to accommodate all groups in two hours.The course instructor does not lecture on this material. Students are assigned a small number ofcourse points for group participation and also vote for the three most effective presentations toprovide peer recognition. Student response is favorable and comparison of scores for nearlyidentical questions from 2009-2011 (lecture) GI exams with scores for 2012-1016 (clay lab)show no differences in scores.

2017 Poultry Health Management School Continuing Education for the Poultry Health Professional

2017 Poultry Health Management School Continuing Education for the Poultry Health Professional

2017 Poultry Health Management School Continuing Education for the Poultry Health Professional

Rob Porter, University of Minnesota, Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory and Veterinary Population Medicine

The Poultry Health Management School (PHMS) is a 16-year program that is a collaboration of core faculty (listed on poster) from the University of Minnesota, The Ohio State University, Purdue University, Midwest University and Michigan State University.  The school location rotates between midwest veterinary schools, but starting 2018 will be held in St. Paul every other year. The school is guided by the academic planning team and is also taught by poultry veterinarians and nutritionists from poultry companies and allied industry. The PHMS is presented as two programs: the Turkey-Broiler Health Management School and the Layer Health Management School. Each of these schools is comprised of two days of lecture, group discussions, and hands-on training in poultry management.  Each two-day school accommodates 75 poultry production personnel and each registrant comes to the school with different knowledge and poultry background.  The teaching topics rotate yearly between 1) disease diagnostics, 2) nutrition, 3) medication and vaccination; and 4) environmental (housing/ ventilation) and management impacts on poultry health.  A goal is to encourage discussion and group learning among the registrants and to reduce total lecture time by engaging the audience in practical case studies during lecture.  Students have two wet labs.  The first is training in bird handling, blood collection, oral and cloacal swab collection, and basic necropsy.  The second lab is a gross pathology case study lab in which students examine a sizeable collection of preserved poultry disease specimens (on permanent storage at UM) and work in groups to answer case study questions that correspond to the disease conditions that are presented. Surveys provided by school attendees indicate that the variation of lecture and lab keeps them engaged, viewing actual disease cases in lab is both practical and useful for retention of information, and that hands-on experiences (e.g., blood collection) are very useful, even for those who have performed these tasks previously.  In addition, some of the attendees were uncomfortable with working in a small group to trouble-shoot case scenarios prior to being lectured on the material.

Helping Students Adjust to the Flipped Classroom

Helping Students Adjust to the Flipped Classroom

Erin Malone, DVM PhD DiplACVS University of Minnesota College of Veterinary Medicine

Active learning has been shown to improve the learning and retention of students in the sciences, including veterinary medicine. However it is impossible to include active learning in our standard curriculum without making bold changes. Flipped classroom designs have students learn basic information outside of class and then use class time to work with the material. This dramatic change from what students generally experienced in their undergraduate and early professional education leads to stress and resistance in many. Understanding the phases of change related stress and using the principles of change management can help with the transition period and improve learning. In the Fall of 2015, a single core course on Large Animal Surgery was flipped using the team based learning (TBL) model for Year 3 students while the rest of the curriculum stayed traditional. After 2 years in the new format, the flipped classroom is settling down with some challenges on both sides and some wins obtained using change management principles. Unfortunately, “trust me, I am the professor” just doesn’t work but some of the things that did help will be discussed.

Teaching and Practicing Clinical Skills: Evidence-Based Recommendations

Teaching and Practicing Clinical Skills: Evidence-Based Recommendations

Teaching and Practicing Clinical Skills: Evidence-Based Recommendations

Erin Malone, DVM PhD DiplACVS University of Minnesota College of Veterinary Medicine

The research in motor skills learning is expanding rapidly across disciplines, particularly as we discover more about the related physical and functional changes in brain structure. While veterinary specific research is definitely lacking and indicated, many of the current findings are likely to be directly applicable to veterinary medicine. This poster will review top principles for teaching and learning motor skills, including pre-laboratory learning, laboratory design, laboratory instructors, feedback and practice principles.

 

Teaching at the intersection of art and science

Teaching at the intersection of art and science

Teaching at the intersection of art and science

Lisa Bofenkamp; Greta Henry; Madeline Jensen; Emily Clarke; Lauren Barcus; Erin Burton; Pat Goodman-Mamula and Dawn Foster-Hartnett

The disciplines of art and science overlap: both require perseverance, creativity and
attention to detail. Art can be used to inspire interest in science and communicate
science to a broader audience. It can also be a tool for learning science. Using art in
education has been shown to increase both cognitive abilities and critical thinking
skills. We have introduced several artistic projects into our graduate (CVM 6925
and GCC 5016) and undergraduate (VBS 1001, VBS 2032, GCC 3016) curricula
designed to enhance student understanding of microbial isolation and identification,
increase student awareness of the diversity and ubiquity of microorganisms,
visualize connections in the immune system, increase student interest in
microbiology and boost student involvement in scientific issues that are important
to them and their community.

Introduction to Biotechnology (VBS 1001): Encouraging Active Learning Through Group Projects

Introduction to Biotechnology (VBS 1001): Encouraging Active Learning Through Group Projects

Introduction to Biotechnology (VBS 1001): Encouraging Active Learning Through Group Projects

Gwantwa Mwakalundwa, Patricia Goodman and Pam Skinner Department of Veterinary and Biomedical Sciences, University of Minnesota

Introduction to Biotechnology (VBS 1001) is a 4-credit introductory course with no prerequisites and is open to students from across the university.   Throughout the second half of the semester, students work on a group project applying biotechnology to address a problem or need in the world today.   They work together in small groups of 4-6 students to prepare both a written paper and a slide presentation.  Class time is provided for the groups to work together with instructors who provide additional guidance and assistance.  Our course emphasizes creativity, encouraging students to think about possible novel approaches utilizing biotechnology to solve global issues. These group projects offer students a chance to demonstrate leadership and engage in conflict resolution to achieve a common goal.

Every semester our students provide some novel approaches on solving some of the world’s notorious challenges. This poster presents some of these creative projects from the student’s perspective. It’s not only what we teach our students that matters, but what they take from the course and how they apply it to real life. In addition to learning from their energy and creativity, we as instructors benefit from their feedback which continuously reshapes this course.

 

An agile framework for the management of graduate research projects

An agile framework for the management of graduate research projects

An agile framework for the management of graduate research projects

McCue, ME and Mickelson, JR

Agile project management principles target rapid adaptation to change with frequent, regular appraisals of a project’s progress and results, and development of a culture of teamwork and self-organization. Agile management has its origins in “lean” manufacturing and software development. Agile principles particularly useful in these fields include continuous improvement, continuously updated project deliverables, and a commitment to fulfilling the needs of various stakeholders.

Similar to software development projects, research projects have requirements that frequently change over time—new results and new interpretations can significantly change project plans and objectives mid-stream. Because the timing and outcomes of research are unpredictable, agile principles and methodologies may lend themselves to the management of research projects and research groups. Agile approaches are iterative with frequent evaluation of results, regular meetings of the team, and explicit (although changeable) “backlog” of tasks (or “user stories”), that can be adapted as needed to move projects efficiently towards a completion1.

Agile software development practices are built on the Agile Manifesto (http://agilemanifesto.org/) and 12 core principles. These principles can be adapted to align with core research practices (Table 1, adapted from 2,3,4,5,6). Agile software development processes can range from a very rigid set of practices (i.e., Scrum) to not having prescribed processes (i.e., Kanban). Our group has been experimenting with the adaptation of agile to research project management using the Scrum framework.  A depiction of the components of this system (user stories, daily meetings, sprints, sprints reviews) that and how we are applying them to our equine genetics and genomics research projects will be presented in the poster session.

Education Day Posters 2017

Preliminary Survey Results on STUDENT-INSTRUCTOR RATIOS in the Gross Anatomy Laboratory

Preliminary Survey Results on STUDENT-INSTRUCTOR RATIOS in the Gross Anatomy Laboratory

Preliminary Survey Results on STUDENT-INSTRUCTOR RATIOS in the Gross Anatomy Laboratory

C.E. Clarkson, Department of Veterinary Biomedical Science, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Minnesota

Abstract: Declining pools of qualified anatomy instructors has been a topic of discussion for decades, yet little is published on what current student-instructor ratios are within the anatomy labs or even how the number of instructors may impact effective laboratory teaching. This poster reports on preliminary survey findings of current student-instructor ratio in veterinary and medical gross anatomy laboratories. The data presented is meant to be a stimulus for deeper conversations that need to take place as we address the learning needs of our students. Included here are preliminary survey results from veterinary and medical schools throughout the world that responded to a survey on gross anatomy laboratory student-instructor ratios at their institution including their perception of the adequacy of that instructor coverage.

Using Moticam Microscope Digital Camera Technology as a Learning Aid in an Active Learning Classroom

Using Moticam Microscope Digital Camera Technology as a Learning Aid in an Active Learning Classroom

Using Moticam Microscope Digital Camera Technology as a Learning Aid in an Active Learning Classroom

Erin N. Burton, DVM, MS, DACVP Veterinary and Biomedical Sciences Department

In the traditional microscopy classroom laboratory, clinical competencies such as microscopy skills, proper identification of microscopic structures, and overall student engagement can be difficult to formally evaluate resulting in subjective assessment and evaluation of student laboratory competencies. The Moticam digital camera technology and desktop monitors, already available at each active learning classroom station in Animal Science/ Veterinary Medicine 104, allows students to project microscopy specimens in real time for group discussion and engagement. Additionally, the digital cameras have the ability to easily acquire both video and images to be saved to a standard SD card. Second year profession veterinary student in the Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory Course (CVM 6925) were provided case based worksheets that correlated to the microscopic specimen provided. Students were asked to acquire specific images correlating to the course and assignment objectives as they worked through each clinical case. These images were used for instructor assessment as well as provided students with a realistic image atlas of various normal cells and common pathologies.

8 Lessons learned from coordinating and developing a 30-hour online class

8 Lessons learned from coordinating and developing a 30-hour online class

8 Lessons learned from coordinating and developing a 30-hour online class

Perle Boyer, DVM, MSpVM

Abstract: The rapid development of technology had enabled the rise of online education. The ability to reach audiences around the globe is appealing to many faculty and institutions. There are still a lot of prejudices and preconceived ideas among faculty. This poster will present the lessons learned from developing an extensive online class.

Design of an interactive roadmap to present food-animal production focused courses at the UMN-CVM

Design of an interactive roadmap to present food-animal production focused courses at the UMN-CVM

Perle Boyer1 , Ryan Rupprecht1

1Department of Veterinary Population Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN

Abstract: Faculty involved in teaching food animal production and medicine noticed over the years that while face-to-face mentoring of students might be the most effective way to guide them in selecting elective courses, rotations and externships, it is dependent upon faculty members’ availability and students’ comfort level with reaching out for advice. Moreover, elective classes and opportunities offered early in the curriculum are not always known to the students. Based on these observations, we decided to develop a catalog of elective and selective courses focusing on food animal topics at destination of veterinary students. This course catalog was designed as an interactive roadmap of metro lines where each line represents a species of interest (beef, dairy, small ruminant, swine, and poultry) and each metro station is a class or a rotation. The roadmap will then be made available to students during their first month of arrival at the College and they will have access to it, as many times as they wish, during the entire duration of the curriculum.

Impact of University of Minnesota Veterinary Student Run Clinics on Community and Animal Health

Impact of University of Minnesota Veterinary Student Run Clinics on Community and Animal Health

Impact of University of Minnesota Veterinary Student Run Clinics on Community and Animal Health

Johnson R, Sample K, Minicucci L, Sharkey L, Walz E, Flynn K.

Intro: People at all socioeconomic levels interact with animals and are often pet owners. The human-animal bond can help people cope with emotional, health, and financial stressors. However, many communities facing socioeconomic challenges have limited access to veterinary care, potentially compromising the human-animal bond and the resulting benefits. The Student Initiative for Reservation Veterinary Services (SIRVS) and Veterinary Treatment Outreach for Urban Community Health (VeTouch) are two student-run programs at the University of Minnesota College of Veterinary Medicine (UMN CVM) that provide veterinary care in underserved communities.

Description: SIRVS provides wellness and spay/neuter clinics to Native American communities, co-hosting 6-7 clinics annually for Minnesota Tribal Nations. VeTouch sponsors monthly wellness clinics hosted at Hennepin Avenue United Methodist Church for low-income clients in Minneapolis.  Both organizations are student-run and managed. With the assistance of volunteer veterinarians, students perform physical exams, dispense vaccines and preventatives, as well as run basic diagnostic tests. In addition to pet food and medications, owners have the opportunity to learn more about animal behavior, environmental enrichment and have veterinary questions answered.  At SIRVS clinics, students also perform spay/neuter surgeries under direct veterinary supervision.

Outcomes: SIRVS provides care to 400-500 animals as well as 80 sterilization procedures per year to Leech Lake, White Earth, Mille Lacs, and Lower Sioux communities. In addition, strong relationships have been formed with community members and clients, and many repeat clients visit SIRVS clinics every year.

VeTouch has served over 850 clients and 2,250 pets since 2009 in the Minneapolis community. The clinic program has become a well-utilized part of the social support services offered at Hennepin Avenue United Methodist Church, and strengthens connections between members of the community.  VeTouch has a strong relationship with local veterinarians, pre-veterinary students, and most recently, volunteer medical Spanish language interpreter students.

Initiatives with SIRVS, VeTouch and The Native American Humane Society (NAHS) have resulted in Native American students participating in externships at the UMN CVM and 20 school-age children participating in a veterinary education program in Leech Lake. In addition, veterinary students from SIRVS and VeTouch will be participating in the AVMA’s Reaching UP program, another community outreach program providing high quality spay/neuter and wellness services to the community of Pueblo of Laguna, New Mexico.

Future: SIRVS and VeTouch are working to include more underserved communities in Minnesota and are looking toward helping other schools develop similar programs.

SIRVS and VeTouch also increase interest in veterinary medicine in communities where previous positive exposure to the profession may be limited. Ideally, a one health approach with integrated care teams is an avenue for interprofessional education and optimally efficient community-based medicine for the “whole family.”

Using Student Input to Inform Curricular Change

Using Student Input to Inform Curricular Change

Using Student Input to Inform Curricular Change

Erin Malone, Margaret Root Kustritz, and Laura Molgaard

The UMN started implementing a curriculum revision in 2013. Caps on credit hours, passive learning (lectures) and course credits were designed into the new curriculum to support student learning and well-being. To determine if these changes were realized and effective, we employed, and subsequently revised, an outcomes assessment plan. Three of these items are presented:

  1. Passive:Active Learning Time – chair time reports and usage of the active learning classroom helped us identify correlations with student reported overload. Based on the results, students need at least 20% of their day “open” for processing, thinking and other activities to be able to maintain consistent effort throughout the semester.

  2. Workload and Semester Flow – weekly reports on time spent outside of class has helped  identify course/course credit mismatches and better determine what the real workload is by semester.

  3. Course evaluations – simplifying the course evaluation process and having students complete the evaluations over one lunch hour has greatly increased our response rate and made the scores more meaningful.

Effect of curriculum change on student learning in theriogenology

Effect of curriculum change on student learning in theriogenology

Effect of curriculum change on student learning in theriogenology

Root Kustritz MV, Madill S.

Theriogenology teaching changed from the old to the new curriculum by consolidation of four species-based courses into a single comparative theriogenology course. Content was consolidated and reduced. All students in the old and new curriculum had access to a set of 100 multiple-choice questions for board review after completing theriogenology pre-clinical training. Percentage correct was compared between students in the old and new curricula. Despite having less content presented from the old to the new curriculum, students did equally well in preparation for the NAVLE examination.

Generational differences and their impact on teaching and learning

Generational differences and their impact on teaching and learning

Generational differences and their impact on teaching and learning

Root Kustritz MV.

Students, staff, and faculty were surveyed regarding life experiences and preferences in learning. Students were raised to expect more flexibility and personalization in training and to do group work. Students in general are comfortable only with a limited number of functions in a few commonly used technologies. Instructors must understand that coursework involving technology will require extensive explanation regardless of the generation being taught. Students must understand that faculty make best choices regarding how course content is presented, which may or may not include instructional technologies.

Education Day Posters 2016

The Value of assessing outcomes of teaching methodologies to guide instructional design

The Value of assessing outcomes of teaching methodologies to guide instructional design

The Value of assessing outcomes of teaching methodologies to guide instructional design

Margaret V. Root Kustritz, DVM, MEd, PhD, DACT Professor, Assistant Dean of Education, University of Minnesota

Instructional design includes determination of appropriate teaching methodologies, how to get students to work with the content appropriately in groups or individually, and how to assess their understanding and skills. Selection of training methodologies should be driven by the learning objectives for the course but often are driven by more pragmatic concerns, such as availability of people to help facilitate small group sessions or provide feedback on assignments in a timely fashion. Instructors cannot know if a given teaching methodology is being used by students as expected without specifically seeking out that information. Examples investigated included podcasts, lecture capture and video review, and discussion forums. Take-home messages were the following: (1) Students listen to podcasts and use audio as a time management tool to enhance their learning, (2) Students use video to clarify their learning, not just as a replacement for class attendance, (3) Students learn from facilitated discussion but instructors may have to force them to participate by making it a course requirement, and (4) Instructors can benefit from using embedded data analysis tools and by surveying students to determine if they use specific teaching methodologies and how they use them.

Pilot study: Use of examination wrappers to direct student self-assessment of examination preparation

Pilot study: Use of examination wrappers to direct student self-assessment of examination preparation

Pilot study: Use of examination wrappers to direct student self-assessment of examination preparation

Margaret V. Root Kustritz, DVM, MEd, PhD, DACT Professor, Assistant Dean of Education, University of Minnesota

Metacognition is defined as the act of thinking about one’s thought processes. Students can be trained in the three steps of metacognition, which are planning and goal setting, monitoring performance, and adapting for the future.  Examination wrappers are short questionnaires that ask the students questions about examination preparation, where they struggled most on this examination, and what they will do differently going forward. Research questions addressed in this study included the following:  Do students who complete an examination wrapper and get it back before the subsequent examination show an increase in percentage points on that examination compared to those who don’t fill out examination wrappers?  Do students who fill out an examination wrapper at least once do better in the course than students who do not fill out any examination wrappers? Students who completed one or two examination wrappers were compared with classmates who completed no examination wrappers. Students in this cohort who completed at least one examination wrapper did not show an increase in examination or course scores compared to their classmates who did not complete examination wrappers. This most likely was due to lack of formal training in metacognition, with students unaware of their role in planning, monitoring, and adapting.

Use of extra credit questions in a comparative theriogenology course

Use of extra credit questions in a comparative theriogenology course

Use of extra credit questions in a comparative theriogenology course

Root Kustritz MV, Madill S

All students in a required 3rd year fall Comparative Theriogenology course were given an opportunity to complete extra credit questions. Other activities in the course included examinations, active learning sessions, group projects, and individually completed assessments. Extra credit questions were drawn from those used for theriogenology resident review and covered a variety of species and topics. One question was made available about every 7 days with topics paralleling those discussed in class. Ninety-three students of the 98 enrolled completed at least one question and 28 completed all 12 questions. Number of questions completed decreased over the semester, with declines over the Thanksgiving break and during weeks with surgery laboratories.  Students agreed or strongly agreed that the extra credit questions helped them review material from the course (85.7%), helped them integrate material from this and other courses (80.0%), and that the amount of time spent was appropriate for the number of points received (75.7%). Students primarily completed the questions to earn extra points. Primary reason for not completing questions was lack of time. Student examination scores and total scores (minus extra credit points) did not vary with number of questions completed. When comparing class rank to ranking within this course, an equal number of students rose, fell, and remained the same, suggesting that completing extra credit questions neither harmed nor helped students.

Pilot study of veterinary student mindset and association with academic performance and perceived stress

Pilot study of veterinary student mindset and association with academic performance and perceived stress

Root Kustritz MV

Individuals with a growth mindset believe that all failures are opportunities and that their baseline intelligence and talent can be used for continuous improvement. Individuals with a fixed mindset believe that baseline intelligence and talent cannot be developed. Growth mindset is associated with greater academic success and greater resilience in the face of failure or stress. Second year veterinary students completed three surveys to determine mindset, perceived levels of stress, and life change score. Of 57 students, 70% had a strong growth mindset or a growth mindset with some fixed ideas. No students had a strong fixed mindset. Mindset was not correlated with GPA or perceived stress level.Colleges of veterinary medicine can assist students by providing resources and training for stress management, including training in how to further develop a growth mindset.

China Program Office

China Program Office

Frank Liu

Starting in 2012, the College of Veterinary Medicine (CVM) initiated a number of continuing educational programs in China as part of an effort to build the college into a leading institute to provide quality veterinary education and research at international level. CVM China Program Office was established to develop and implement programs including Leman China Swine Conference, China Dairy Conference, and Small Animal Veterinary Conference. These activities have not only built CVM and UMN reputation and competitiveness in global continuing education, training, and research, but also generated revenue for graduate studies and leveraged teaching and research resources to more effectively accomplish the CVM's missions.

Logistics of Lecture Capture

Logistics of Lecture Capture

Root Kustritz MV, Rupprecht R

Collegiate policy at the University of Minnesota College of Veterinary Medicine is that all lectures in the DVM curriculum that are scheduled in lecture halls containing MediaSite recording equipment will be recorded for student use unless the coordinator / instructor opts out. Concerns raised by faculty members about lecture capture include lack of attendance by students, and concerns about when and how recordings are made available and to whom. Faculty members use lecture capture to inform themselves about what is being presented in other courses and to verify content as they prepare assessments. Students use lecture capture to review material, to verify information in their notes and to enhance notes taken during lecture, to meet needs specific to their learning styles, and to manage stress and life-work balance.

Using student input to inform curricular change

Using student input to inform curricular change

Erin Malone, Margaret Root Kustritz, and Laura Molgaard

The UMN started implementing a curriculum revision in 2013. Caps on credit hours, passive learning (lectures) and course credits were designed into the new curriculum to support student learning and well-being. To determine if these changes were realized and effective, we employed, and subsequently revised, an outcomes assessment plan. Three of these items are presented:

  1. Passive:Active Learning Time – chair time reports and usage of the active learning classroom helped us identify correlations with student reported overload. Based on the results, students need at least 20% of their day “open” for processing, thinking and other activities to be able to maintain consistent effort throughout the semester.
  2. Workload and Semester Flow – weekly reports on time spent outside of class has helped identify course/course credit mismatches and better determine what the real workload is by semester.
  3. Course evaluations – simplifying the course evaluation process and having students complete the evaluations over one lunch hour has greatly increased our response rate and made the scores more meaningful.

Using Cellphones and Art to Stimulate Interest and Involvement

Using Cellphones and Art to Stimulate Interest and Involvement

Jennifer Holmberg, Isaac Waalen, Amanda Ruddle, Apoorva Reddy, Patricia Mamula-Goodman and Dawn Foster-Hartnett

Inquiry-based laboratory exercises can increase student interest and involvement however, introductory microbiology students often lack the laboratory skills required to pursue their own questions.  This year we developed a curriculum that allowed students to isolate and characterize colorful bacteria from the air and snowflakes as a way to gain laboratory skills, learn about the immune system, explore microbial growth characteristics and obtain isolate identity using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectroscopy (MALDI-TOF MS).  Students could use cell phone adapters for the microscopes to document Gram stains and to share their work. The project culminated in an agar art contest that showcased students’ aseptic technique and creativity.  Surveys suggest that the use of cell phones and the art contest increased students’ interest and enjoyment of the lab.

Introducing an Inquiry-driven Research Project Helps Students Integrate Lecture and Lab Concepts

Introducing an Inquiry-driven Research Project Helps Students Integrate Lecture and Lab Concepts

Isaac Waalen, Jennifer Holmberg, Apoorva Reddy, Amanda Ruddle, Patricia Mamula-Goodman and Dawn Foster-Hartnett

The 2001 National Science Foundation’s Vision and Change in Undergraduate Biology Education report calls for a shift from teaching students to memorize “facts” to a curriculum that is student-centered and relevant. Allowing students to ask and research their own questions strengthens critical thinking skills necessary for the 21st century. A core competency mentioned in the Vision and Change report is that students develop the ability to apply the process of scientific inquiry. This semester we asked 50 groups of students to reflect on the concepts they learned in General Microbiology (VBS 2032) and to write a research proposal for three lab sessions (6 hours) of experiments. Proposals were reviewed and revised, experiments were conducted and research reports were written. Although topics were not assigned, many proposals focused on the oral and skin microbiome, antibiotic resistance in food and antibiotic resistance in the environment. Students reported that the independent projects helped them pursue their own interests and to integrate concepts learned throughout the semester in lecture and lab. From the instructors’ perspective, we will present the challenges faced with leading 200 students through original research projects. 

Gecko Feet, Elephant Trunk and Shark Skin

Gecko Feet, Elephant Trunk and Shark Skin

C.E. Clarkson; Department of Veterinary and Biomedical Sciences

The gecko's feet allow ease of scaling vertical heights, the elephant's trunk is a 'hand' for grasping and the shark's skin hinders the attachment of barnacles. Through millions of years of evolution these functional 'parts' represent adaptive advantages for survival of these creatures; to humans they represent opportunities to understand and create innovative designs that address problems in need of solutions (e.g., the development of products which adhere to a variety of surfaces, improved grasping and object manipulation with innovative designs and repellent/inhibitory products that hinder bacterial growth). All of these are examples of mimicking biology, i.e., BIOMIMICRY. This fascinating, nature-inspired problem solving approach is an important component that has been integrated into my undergraduate course, Companion Animal Anatomy (VBS 2100). The purpose of this poster is to inspire you to include educational goals in your own courses which may inspire our future innovators.

Prosected Cadaver Videos as a Learning Aid in Carnivore Veterinary Gross Anatomy

Prosected Cadaver Videos as a Learning Aid in Carnivore Veterinary Gross Anatomy

Abby L Brown, Christina E Clarkson, Thomas F Fletcher, and Kari J Ekenstedt

1Veterinary and Biomedical Sciences Department, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN 55108

Veterinary gross anatomy is taught based on visual and hands-on learning through dissection. Veterinary students would greatly benefit from having guided video ‘tours’ of the dissection to be performed for each laboratory session. We produced fifty carnivore dissection videos, one cat and one dog, for each of the 25 existing carnivore dissection laboratories in the University of Minnesota’s Anatomy I (Carnivore) course; the labs are based upon the sequencing in the textbook Guide to Dissection of the Dog. The videos include audio explanation of terms and anatomical features, as well as descriptions of dissection instructions, along with visually identifying applicable structures for each lab. Videos were posted on the University of Minnesota’s Veterinary Anatomy website (http://vanat.cvm.umn.edu/carnLabs), where they are freely available to the public. For in-class use, videos were shown in Pre-Lab sessions in the lecture hall. The videos were astoundingly successful. The students used them consistently in many additional ways: during the lab session while dissecting (viewing on their own phones or tablet computers), as aids when reviewing their cadavers for studying, and as study aids when remote from the anatomy lab. The students ranked the videos as having “extreme value” in 88% of responses. In their first year, the videos have already been in use by veterinary students from across North America. Subjectively, the Anatomy I faculty felt this year’s carnivore anatomy course, now with videos, resulted in students that were more engaged, more proactive about answering their own questions while dissecting, and that the videos decreased the amount of questions asked in lab. Student reviews and comments on semester evaluations were entirely positive regarding the videos and their high educational value.

Designing a new corn endophyte

Designing a new corn endophyte

Patricia Goodman-Mamula1, Zixuan Liu2 and Pamela Skinner1

Department of Veterinary and Biomedical Sciences, VBS 1001 student,University of Minnesota 

Introduction to Biotechnology (VBS 1001) is a 4 credit introductory course with no prerequisites. This entry-level course is open to anyone interested in biotechnology from any college or unit across the university. This poster presents a representative group project, “Designing a New Corn Endophyte” from the Spring 2016 class. Group projects are an important educational tool since they help prepare students for the challenges of the modern team based work environment. As part of our class group project, 18 students were divided into 5 groups of either 3 or 4 students. Each group was tasked to develop feasible strategies utilizing biotechnology to solve real world problems. Students selected their own topics, then developed and refined these topics in an iterative fashion. Projects this year included the creation of drought resistant carrots, genetic modification of bacteria for the degradation of plastics, modification of bacteria in corn for nitrogen fixation, reduction of water utilization by walnut trees and bioengineering nitrogen sensing hydrangeas. These projects were presented in both written and oral form at the conclusion of the semester and evaluated by both faculty and students. This group assignment allowed the evaluation of students based on their creative, collaborative and communication skills.  These are important skill sets that are not easily measured with standardized tests. For this poster session one of our students will be presenting her group’s proposal.

Canine Brain Sections Tutor - A Self-Study Tutor for Learning Brain Anatomy


Canine Brain Sections Tutor - A Self-Study Tutor for Learning Brain Anatomy


A. Beitz and T. Fletcher

Re: http://vanat.cvm.umn.edu/brainTutor/

Canine Brain Sections Tutor is an interactive web app for tablets and computers. It is intended to engage and maintain student interest; thereby, encouraging students to learn internal brain anatomy at their own pace. 

Twelve brain transection levels can be selected directly or through an image Index. Each brain level presents structures labeled by dots along with associated terms listed in random order. Clicking either a dot or a term reveals the correct association via matching colors. Alternatively, clicking a Reveal Answers button draws lines between each dot and its correct term. Per level, students can limit choices to either a preliminary set of terms or a more advanced term set. At any time student may view a glossary popup or see the brain image only.

Quiz: The web app includes randomly generated Quiz questions, each consisting of a randomly selected brain level, a randomly chosen brain structure and five terms listed in random order. Term selection (by click/tap or keyboard number) reveals correct/incorrect status and updates an ongoing Percent Correct tally. Alternatively, clicking/tapping the labeled structure will reveal the correct answer but skip the tally. The Quiz can be restricted to just preliminary terms or expanded to include all terms.

Veterinary Developmental Anomalies - A Web Site of Anomaly Images

Veterinary Developmental Anomalies - A Web Site of Anomaly Images

V. S. Cox and T. F. Fletcher

Re: http://vanat.cvm.umn.edu/vetAnomal/

Veterinary Developmental Anomalies presents a collection of developmental anomaly images that Dr. Cox assembled over many years of specimen collection and preparation. The collection is augmented by additional specimen and radiographic images solicited from colleagues. 

On the web site, images are organized into five Systems and five Regions. Each System/Region section presents a list of anomalies, a related commentary, a link to normal developmental anatomy, and an array of reduced-size images. Clicking a small image pops-up an enlarged image with a caption and labels that can be toggled on/off.

The five Systems are: Musculoskeletal, Nervous, Cardiovascular, Digestive and Urogenital.

The five Regions are: Head, Thorax & Neck, Abdomen & Pelvis, Limbs and Whole Body.

Cattle Handling to Improve First Year Veterinary Students Comfort around Cows

Cattle Handling to Improve First Year Veterinary Students Comfort around Cows

Sorge, U.S. and T.J. Goldsmith

Department of Veterinary Population Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Minnesota, Saint Paul MN 55108

Veterinary students are from a multitude of backgrounds and many have never interacted with cattle. During clinical skills training all students need to become familiar with interactions and handling of cattle before an actual physical exam is taught. Therefore, following a lecture about cattle behavior and good handling practice, all first year veterinary students are expected to work with cattle during a hands-on exercise. They learn how to herd loose cattle and also how to safely interact with cattle restrained in head locks, i.e. during close contact. The objective of this study was to evaluate, if this approach was useful to students and made them more comfortable around cattle. During the fall semester of 2015, 97 of 103 students participated in a brief pre-post test about the lab. About half of the students (48%) had never interacted with cattle and 33% wanted to ultimately enter small animal practice. Although no student was frightened of cattle prior to the lab, 32% were insecure. However, after the lab, 96% of students found the lab helpful and only 3% of students remained insecure. The majority of students indicated that they had improved their attitude towards cows (72%) or it remained the same (28%). Herding lose cattle was the favorite exercise of many students (55%), while the most common ‘worst’ moment for students was “nothing” (n=27) or ‘great lab’ (n=12).

Overall, these exercises were positively received by students and are an easily implemented way to improve the students comfort and safety around cattle.

Veterinary Medicine and Service Learning: Opportunities to Support Human Health

Veterinary Medicine and Service Learning: Opportunities to Support Human Health

Global Health In Thailand

Global Health In Thailand

Global Health In Thailand

Karin Hamilton and Tricia Todd

Global Health in Thailand: Humans, Elephants, and Disease is a new two week global seminar in Thailand combined with a follow-on seven week course on campus where students learn about and practice inter-professional teamwork and intercultural problem-solving using One Health approaches. Undergraduate students interested in health gain an understanding of the intersection between animal health, human health, and the environment by exploring tuberculosis, a zoonotic disease which occurs in humans and elephants in Thailand. Using tuberculosis as an example disease, students explore a spectrum of factors that impact health including social, cultural, historical, and economical factors. Students participate in many team activities as well as self-reflection throughout the course. This experiential and team-based course builds self-awareness and exposes students to the significance and multitude of factors that impact health before they enter into their specific health career fields and further education.

The New Health Professions Team

The New Health Professions Team

The New Health Professions Team

Tricia Todd and Karin Hamilton

The New Health Professions Team is a 2 credit experiential based course designed to help pre-professional students learn about the interprofessional (IP) competencies, and to practice them as they participate in role-playing in interprofessional teams while solving a complex One Health challenge. The course is divided into three phases: the first allows students to learn about the skills and competencies needed to be an effected IP team member; the second phase puts students into uni-professional teams; and the final phase puts students into IP teams. Students work through a fictional campus foodborne diseases outbreak case. First, they work to understand the various professionals involved, and then become part of an interprofessional team learning to problem-solve together. This course involves a variety of health professionals as subject matter experts. Students also participate in self-reflection and peer review.